Index |Biograph|Diary|Works|Qiuzhuang Project|Criticism|Event|Contact|Links

 

Login
Uesername:
Password:
 




Serch

9 生日 张世杰大爷前天去世!哀悼! :
Village Collection: On Li Mu’s Qiuzhuang Project   | Date :2014-05-26 |  From :iamlimu.org
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jesse Birch

In August 2012 the artists’ collective Zuzhi (Zhao Junyuan, Tao Yi, Xu Zhe, and Li Mu) 
presented the exhibition WOOD WORK at Shanghai’s V Artspace. Each artist engaged 
with wood as both a medium and a theme, looking at the physical and cultural 
properties of the material from different points of view. While most of the works in 
the exhibition were actually made of wood, Li Mu’s contribution was a spoken 
narrative sound piece called My Father (2012), played from simple speakers mounted 
to the ceiling of the space.

Li Mu comes from a small Chinese woodworking village of about one thousand 
people in Jiangsu province, called Qiuzhuang, where his father worked as a 
carpenter. Through this sound work, Li Mu tells of the disconnect he felt between 
himself, his father, and the village as a whole while he was growing up and becoming 
an artist. The material of wood weaves in and out of 
the story as the narrative unfolds.1 This work marks the beginning of Li Mu’s artistic 
engagement with his home village.

按此在新窗口打开图片
Li Mu, My Father,    2012, sound installation in the exhibition Shanghai. Courtesy of 
Li Mu.

按此在新窗口打开图片
Li Mu, Shanzhai Van Abbemuseum, 2013, installation view in the Artspace, Shanghai. 
Courtesy of Li Mu.

A year after the WOOD WORK exhibition, I visited V Artspace to see a different group 
exhibition, THE SUN, during the worst heat wave eastern China had seen in 140 
years. THE SUN featured at least twenty-five artists, including three of the members 
of Zuzhi. Upon entering the exhibition space, I was dwarfed by a photographic wall 
mural by Li Mu titled Shanzai Van Abbemuseum, which depicted a dry dirt road 
running through a rural village in China. In the picture, two small industrial vehicles 
pass stacks of logs, piles of rubble, and a brick wall adorned with three painted 
images of Mao Zedong.

Seeing the Chairman’s likeness on the walls of a village wasn’t surprising in itself, but 
these weren’t official Party images; they were versions of Andy Warhol’s colourful 
Mao, from 1972. Warhol’s massive retrospective, 15 Minutes Eternal, had recently 
closed in Shanghai and was about to open in Beijing, but state censorship had 
prevented Warhol’s Maos from being included in either show.

The images of Mao depicted in Shanzai Van Abbemuseum, however, are part of Li 
Mu’s Qiuzhuang Project: A Dispersed Museum (December 2012– ongoing), a long-
term engagement with the artist’s home village. In this project, significant works 
from the collection of the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, are 
reproduced and installed in Qiuzhuang. This photomural of a scene from the 
Qiuzhuang Project, along with a descriptive text about the project sourced from an 
American blog,2 was Li Mu’s contribution to THE SUN.

The title of this mural suggests a questioning of authenticity. Shanzai means 
knockoff or imitation, but this hardly does justice to the layers of reproduction and 
reception happening in Li Mu’s Qiuzhuang Project. With the inclusion of the blog 
text, this work indexes multiple potential ways of experiencing the project and its 
three particular types of audience: the art community in Shanghai where Li Mu had 
been living and working until recently, the globally dispersed online audience, and 
the audience that Li Mu values most—the Qiuzhuang villagers themselves.

Two days later, and after three hours on the high-speed Harmony train plus an hour 
in a taxicab operated by an old friend of Li Mu’s, I was standing in the village of 
Qiuzhuang. It was even hotter there than in Shanghai, and I began to wonder if this 
was why Li Mu included an image of this place in THE SUN. The dirt road in the 
photomural is actually the village’s main road and, along with the Warhols, it now 
serves as a museum for numerous reproductions of works from the Van 
Abbemuseum’s collection. On display are pieces by Daniel Buren, Dan Flavin, John 
Kormeling, and Sol LeWitt, with videos of performances by Marina Abramovic and 
Ulay on a permanent loop in the village’s rudimentary grocery store. At the time of 
writing, there are still plans in the works for Carl Andre and Richard Long pieces to 
be fabricated.

The artworks Li Mu chose to exhibit in Qiuzhuang are directly linked to a particular 
lineage in the trajectory of Western modern art, but contrary to the modernist notion 
of artistic autonomy, the Qiuzhuang Project

按此在新窗口打开图片
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012– ongoing, with Andy Warhol's Mao paintings, 1972. 
Courtesy of Li Mu.

按此在新窗口打开图片
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012– ongoing, with Daniel Buren’s Courtesy of Li Mu.

has its own particular engagement with external indexes and influences, complicated 
by problems of reproduction, reception, and translation. Each “original” artwork, as it 
made its way from its place and time of creation to its home in the permanent 
collection of the Van Abbemuseum was already transformed through numerous 
contextual shifts and through the passage of time, but what, if anything, is left of the 
work now that it has become part of the Qiuzhuang Project? Do the stripy Daniel 
Buren pieces that once followed the artist’s desires to take them out of the institution 
and onto the streets still speak the same language when they find their way, via a 
museum’s collection, through reproduction, to the front of a provisional garden of 
corn on a dirt road in a small Chinese village?

Walter Benjamin speaks of the changes that occur once an artwork is completed, in 
terms of “subject matter” and “truth content.” For Benjamin, when a great work is 
first made, the subject matter and the truth content are fully intertwined, but 
through the contingencies of context, and the passage of time, the two diverge, and 
the truth content becomes less and less perceptible. If one subscribes to the 
existence of a transcendental essence of truth (the most modernist of notions), can 
that essence be supplanted with a new one? In his essay The Work of Art in the Age 
of Mechanical Production, Benjamin famously argues that through reproduction, the 
original artwork loses its essence, its aura. Boris Groys points out, however, that 
Benjamin, for all of his foresight, was mistaken when he wrote from a position that 
assumed a particular normative origin for each work. As Groys states:

There are no eternal copies, as there are no eternal originals. Reproduction is as 
much infected by originality as originality is infected by reproduction. In circulating 
through various contexts, a copy becomes a series of different originals. Every 
change of context, every change of medium, can be interpreted as a negation of the 
status of a copy as a copy—as an essential rupture, as a new start that opens a new 
future. In this sense, a copy is never really a copy but rather a new original, in a new 
context.3

In China, the production of “new originals” is a massive industry, and when 
considering the act of reproducing famous Western artworks, another village comes 
to mind: Danfen Village, where thousands of artists work producing countless 
imitations of renowned paintings and prints for domestic and international sale 
(including Andy Warhol’s Mao.)4 But Qiuzhuang is not Danfen, and while it would 
have been faster, cheaper, and easier to have much of the work made elsewhere in 
China, Li Mu made a clear decision to work directly with his community to create a 
decidedly local museum of reimagined Western Art. With presentations like Shanzai 
Van Abbemuseum, and on his Web site, Li Mu facilitates the reception of the project 
outside of Qiuzhuang, but the villagers are his primary audience.

In China, often known in the West as the global hub of cheap, alienated labour, Li Mu 
decided to produce these artworks in the most un-alienated way possible. He worked 
with the expertise of those around him to create the works and to respond to the 
contingencies of the local while fostering a kind of shared understanding. Rather 
than being revealed to the public once they were complete, a good portion of Li Mu’s 
local audience took part in the production of the work itself. Through the process of 
making and displaying these “new originals,” stories and relationships evolved.

While the Qiuzhuang Project is seen by some as an importation of Western values to a 
rural Chinese village through art, what Li Mu is doing is more subversive. Like most 
contemporary artists, Li Mu is using pre-existing ideas and aesthetics and radically 
transforming them by setting them in sharp relief against the conditions of reality. Li 
Mu is not indoctrinating the villagers into Western culture; he is allowing the village 
to be impressed onto the artworks. The villagers, while interested in what Li Mu is 
doing, come to these things in their lives on their own terms, and some don’t come 
to them at all.

The first art object from the Van Abbemuseum collection that was produced in the 
village was a zigzag, ladder-like sculpture called Untitled (Wall Structure) first made 
by Sol LeWitt in 1972. Li Mu didn’t just produce the artwork as it was when LeWitt 
first created it, he made it informed by Superflex’s Free Sol LeWitt project, in which 
the Danish collective fabricated versions of this artwork in the Van Abbemuseum and 
gave them to visitors free of charge. These works not only moved into unlikely 
contexts and acquired new narratives of their own, they infected the “original” work 
with the further potentiality of freedom.

Li Mu “borrowed” the Untitled (Wall Structure) already coloured by the Superflex 
intervention and worked with a small group of villagers to reproduce fifteen of them. 
They were then distributed to interested people in Qiuzhuang. Through the process 
of creating these sculptures, Li Mu began making new connections in his village and, 
producing these

按此在新窗口打开图片
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012– ongoing, with Sol LeWitt's Untitled (Wall Structure), 1972. 
Courtesy of Li Mu.

按此在新窗口打开图片
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012– ongoing, with Sol LeWitt's Wall Drawing No. 480, 
1986. 
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012–ongoing, with Sol LeWitt's Wall Drawing No. 256, 1975. 
Courtesy of Li Mu.

ostensibly useless art objects, created something useful: community ties. However, 
once these works started appearing in people’s houses they acquired other kinds of 
usefulness. Li Mu’s father installed the sculpture on the ceiling of his garage so it 
could be used to hang his bird cages; his neighbour installed his on an angle and 
used it to display his travel souvenirs and trinkets. Soon the wall sculptures became 
coveted. Having missed out on the original distribution, one young man made his 
own wooden version as a shelf in his living room. The first Untitled (Wall Structure), 
safe within the confines of the Van Abbemuseum’s collection, is now informed by the 
fact that it has siblings doing peculiar things, not only around Eindhoven, but also in 
Qiuzhuang, China.

In addition to the distributed sculptures, Li Mu collaborated with a number of 
assistants to paint two other Sol LeWitt works: Wall Drawing No. 480 and Wall 
Drawing No. 256, on the outsides of buildings. Among Li Mu’s assistants was Lu 
Daode, a village elder and calligraphic painter. Li Mu became aware of this skilled 
painter when he was younger and wanted to become a painter himself, but had no 
particular reason to connect with him. When planning the Sol LeWitt wall murals, Li 
Mu attempted to hire Lu Daode to help paint. At first he was uninterested in 
participating, but Li Mu was persistent, and Lu Daode eventually agreed.

The village has no written history, so in order for stories of the past to be retained, 
they have to be told over and over again. The sharing of labour is also conducive to 
sharing stories. As Benjamin observes “The more self- forgetful the listener is, the 
more deeply is what he listens to impressed upon his memory. When the rhythm of 
work has seized him, he listens to the tales in such a way that the gift of retelling 
them comes to him all by itself.”5 Lu Daode, who worked with his hands all of his 
life, was clearly a practiced storyteller. I heard stories from Lu Daode through Li Mu 
even before I met the painter. These stories as they circulate through word of mouth, 
Li Mu’s blog, and now this essay, become an important part of the Qiuzhuang 
Project.

The village has in many ways determined Lu Daode’s life and career. Early in his life, 
he was a painter specializing in flowers and birds, and as we sat under his shrine to 
Mao, eating grapes from his vine and listening to his songbirds, he told us that 
during the Cultural Revolution he was invited to a group exhibition, but the state 
decided that his paintings of natural things did not serve the advancement of 
Communism, and so he was forbidden to participate. Shortly thereafter, a theatre 
troupe asked him to join them as a set painter, but because of the hukou residency 
permit system, which determines where one can work, live, receive education, and 
raise a family, he was unable to leave the village. He eventually gave up painting for a 
living and, like many others in the village, became a woodworker and general 
handyman.

Since retiring he has begun painting full time again, specializing in Chinese folk 
goddesses. He has once again become renowned, and his new paintings are coveted 
by spiritual mediums who use them to facilitate communication with the gods. When 
I asked him what he thought of the Sol LeWitt wall drawings, one mustard-coloured 
with rainbow pyramids and the other a network of intersecting white lines, he said 
that while he enjoyed Li Mu’s company, he does not like painting things that are not 
useful.

For Lu Daode, useful meant pictorial, but, as suggested earlier, many of the works in 
the Qiuzhuang Project have become useful in different ways by virtue of necessity. It 
is said that when useful things enter a museum they become art, but the reverse is 
also true; when artworks are far enough from the museum, they can become useful 
again. Like the Sol LeWitt wall sculptures that have become shelves and hangers, the 
Dan Flavin and John Körmeling light works have become streetlights. In the evenings 
villagers linger nearby as these artworks provide the first nighttime illumination the 
dirt road had ever seen.

John Kormeling's HI HA (1992), which consists of the words HI HA repeated 
numerous times in red and yellow carnival lights, was installed directly across the 
street from the small general store. Thanks to the illuminated artwork, the shop has 
become a popular hang out at night. The store is owned by Li Mu’s uncle, Wang 
Guoqi, and on a single monitor perched atop a refrigerator next to the store shelves, 
the complete collection

按此在新窗口打开图片
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012–ongoing, with Sol LeWitt's Untitled (Wall Structure), 1972. 
Courtesy of Li Mu.

按此在新窗口打开图片
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012 ongoing, with Marina Abramovic and Ulay's video 
compilation in a Qiuzhuang grocery store. Courtesy of Li Mu.

按此在新窗口打开图片
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012–ongoing, with John HI HA, 1992. Courtesy of Li Mu.

of Marina Abramovic and Ulay's performance documentation, up to their farewell on 
the Great Wall of China, plays on a loop. Li Mu’s uncle is a very outgoing guy, and the 
grocery store is a social place, so the video weaves its way into

everyday conversations: sometimes out of interest and sometimes out of discomfort. 
Other than the Warhol portraits of Mao, which are deemed by some to be 
disrespectful, the only artwork in the Qiuzhuang Project that villagers really feel 
uncomfortable with is the famous Abramovic and Ulay work, Imponderabilia (1977), 
in which the naked artists face each other in the entranceway to the museum forcing 
visitors who wish to enter to choose between facing one of them or the other as they 
squeeze through. Li Mu’s uncle acts as a spokesperson for the video explaining that 
it’s not meant to be sexual, but rather to show the natural form of the human body. 
While this might be itself a contestable position, it seems to have satisfied the local 
naysayers. Currently Li Mu’s uncle is reading an Abramović autobiography so 
that he can be a more informative host.

These encounters with the contingencies of everyday life are what Li Mu feels are the 
most important elements of his project. In a letter to Charles Esche, director of the 
Van Abbemuseum, Li Mu explains his thoughts around the encounters between the 
village and the artworks using the context of John Körmeling's, HI HA as an example:

The owner of the house planted beans in front of the installation. Soon the beans 
crawled over the whole rack and covered most of the installation. When the art is 
confronted with people’s practical interests, it gives way to the latter. Therefore they 
can coexist in

a harmonious way and enrich the artworks. Because what I care about is the 
relationship between the art and its surrounding environment, not the art itself.The 
Van Abbemuseum has a sophisticated approach to sharing its collection. Other recent 
projects, like Picasso in Palestine and the aforementioned Free Sol LeWitt, also 
involved unconventional modes of distributing works from the institution’s collection. 
Picasso in Palestine was initiated by Khaled Hourani, artist and artistic director of the 
International Art Academy Palestine, and realized through collaboration between the 
Academy and the Van Abbemuseum. The complications that arose from attempting 
to ship and display a priceless artwork in occupied Palestine, became part of the 
work, and will be imbedded in the cultural understanding of the painting from now 
on. The painting, Buste de Femme (1943), depicts a woman with an almost 
mechanical cubist visage, what Slavoj Žižek calls an “occupied face,” 
showing that even a Picasso is not free from the influences of contextual shifts.7 
Buste de Femme will return to the Van Abbemuseum as an occupied face. What 
projects like Free Sol LeWitt, Picasso in Palestine, and Qiuzhuang Project show is that 
when artworks enter new territories, they forever carry those territories with them. 
Qiuzhuang Project is supported by the Van Abbemuseum, but, how and if the work 
will enter the museum (again) is still unclear, and perhaps the lives of these works are 
only beginning.

In considering this project and its institutional connection, it is important to 
remember that Li Mu is not working as some kind of adjunct curator for the Van 
Abbemuseum; he is working as an artist, and while the project still seems malleable, 
this is the norm for Li Mu, an artist whose work is process- based, socially-oriented, 
contingent, and difficult to pin down. For example, in 2009 he found a stranger’s 
name card in Shanghai, and for one year he sent this person a present every month 
without ever indentifying himself. For Double Infinity, an exhibition produced 
through a partnership between the Van Abbemuseum and Art Hub Asia and held at 
the Dutch Culture Centre in Shanghai parallel to the World Expo 2010, Li Mu 
simultaneously acquired cultural and monetary capital. For his contribution, the artist 
simply requested a job working for Van Abbemuseum as a general employee, being 
paid at the European standard (New Job, 2010). This tension between social and 
cultural expectations to make a tangible income, and the artists desire for creative 
sovereignty, is present in Qiuzhuang Project as well.

按此在新窗口打开图片
Li Mu, Blued Books, 2008–09, juvenile prison library project. Courtesy of Li Mu.

按此在新窗口打开图片
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012– ongoing, Children reading in 

Recently Li Mu has instigated a number of projects involving books and libraries. For 
Public Knowledge (2008), he opened his personal library to the public, allowing 
visitors to borrow books on the honour system. Later, for Blued Books (2008–09), he 
worked with inmates at a juvenile prison facility to develop a library for them, and 
offered mentorship if they needed it. As curator Biljana Ciric says of this work, this 
approach ␣moves beyond the productive role of the artist, affording him the more 
complex role as a friend or teacher, as someone who listens and is situated between 
the institutional system and its subjects.8 It is in this unanchored interstitial zone 
that Li Mu’s art happens.

The Qiuzhuang Project began with a library too. Before Li Mu started producing the 
artworks, he opened a library, known as “A LIBRARY,” where adults and, especially, 
children could find information about the artworks if they wanted. Perhaps more 
importantly, library patrons could just spend time reading or watching a movie. Li Mu 
sees the library as a space to help reconnect him to his community, by providing 
something that he dreamt of but never had as a child: a place for exploring culture. 
As he explains “The library is a public space that connects local people with the 
outside world and helps [in] establishing a reciprocal understanding. Through the 
library, I can spread my knowledge and experience gradually, let the villagers 
understand me, and acknowledge the next steps of the project.”9 This slow process 
of development is central to the Qiuzhuang Project’s local success, but its reception 
elsewhere functions much differently.

按此在新窗口打开图片
Qiuzhuang Project, 2012–ongoing, with Dan Flavin's Untitled to a man, (George 
McGovern), 1972. Courtesy of Li Mu.

I first came to know about the project on the Van Abbemuseum’s Facebook page, but 
while I could have written this essay having never visited the village, and I didn’t 
know what more I expected to understand by visiting Qiuzhuang, I decided that if I 
didn’t go, the possibility of an impoverished understanding was too great. When 
speaking with villagers, however, I was confronted by the fact that understanding is 
dispersed there too. Qiuzhuang is rich in specificity, but at the same time it is prone 
to the contingencies that come with global networks of capital and communication. 
These contingencies will also impact the village in a tangible way: soon the dirt road 
will be widened and paved to connect two main roads, and most of the houses and 
workshops that are supporting the artworks in the Qiuzhuang Project will be 
expropriated and destroyed to make room for it. It’s unclear what kind of legacy the 
Qiuzhuang Project will have in the village, but

while Li Mu is more concerned with the process than with the end result, for the 
duration of my time in Qiuzhuang, his assistant, Zhong Ming was documenting every 
conversation. Li Mu hopes that by the end of a year he will have a documentary that 
not only records the project, but also the passing of time.

Now that the Qiuzhuang Project has been in process for almost a year, at least one 
thing is certain, Li Mu’s connections with his father and the village have improved. As 
Li Mu relates in the sound work that I mentioned at the beginning of this essay (My 
Father, 2012), one day his father asked him “Like me seeing the birds that I raise, do 
you feel great when you see your works?” Li Mu answered, “Yes, the birds are your 
works.”10 Recently Li Mu uploaded two pictures onto his Web site under a post called 
Untitled. One was of his neighbour, who was one of the main builders of the Dan 
Flavin work, proudly holding up what looks like massive orchid, and the other image 
was of the artist’s father holding a cage with his prized canaries.11

Notes
1    Li Mu, “Carpentry,” I Am Li Mu, http://www.iamlimu.org/blogview.asp?
logID=186/. 2    Greg Allen, “Shanzai Van Abbemuseum by Li Mu,” 2013, Greg.org, 
2012, http://greg.org/
archive/2013/06/07/shanzhai_van_abbemuseum_by_li_mu.html/.
3    Boris Groys, “Politics of Installation,” e-flux journal no. 2 (January 2009), 
http://www.e-flux.com/  issues/2-january-2009/.
4    John Seed, “The Ghosts of Chairman Mao and Andy Warhol Haunt a Hong Kong 
Auction,” Huffington Post, May 27, 2010, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-
seed/the-ghosts-of-chairman-ma_b_590907. html/.
5    Walter Benjamin, “The Storyteller: Reflections on the Works of Nikolai Leskov,” 
in Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings Volume 3, 1935–1938 (Cambridge: The 
Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002), 143.
6    Emphasis mine. Li Mu, “Letter to Charles 6,” I Am Li Mu, May 27, 2013, 
http://www.iamlimu.org/  blogview.asp?logID=272/.
7    Slavoj Žižek, “Slavoj Žižek in Conversation About Picasso in Palestine,” Van 
Abbemuseum/Youtube, June 23, 2011, http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=Z3lvYqOVlv4/.
8    Biljana Ciric, “Back to the Basics: Li Mu’s Perception of Human Relations and 
Social Interactions,” I Am Li Mu, September 5, 2011, 
http://www.iamlimu.org/blogview.asp? logID=122/.
9    Li Mu, “About Qiuzhuang Project,” I Am Li Mu, March 11, 2013, 
http://www.iamlimu.org/ blogview. asp?logID=214/.
10 Li Mu, “Carpentry,” I Am Li Mu, 2012, http://www.iamlimu.org/blogview.asp?
logID=186/. 
11 Special thanks to Gu Ling for acting as translator on my trip to 
Qiuzhuang.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
© iamlimu.org 2011